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Guinea

Guinea

International or regional conventions

The Republic of Guinea is a member/signatory to the following international or regional Conventions related to cetacean conservation:

Confirmed observations

“The species is documented from a sighting (Cadenat, 1956) and capture (Van Waerebeek et al., 2004) in the Conakry region of southern Guinea. Weir (2015) recently reported eight sightings from the wider Río Nuñez region of northern Guinea.”

Threats and trends

No abundance estimates are available for Guinea, but Bamy et al. (2007) report on bycatch of Sousa teuszii in the Bay of Sangareah, and more recent observations of live animals and strandings have been recorded by various researchers, mostly concentrated around Kamsar Port and the Tristao Islands. Weir (2016) identified a minimum of 47 individuals  near Kamsar, and Bamy et al 2021 identified potential threats from fishing activities around the Tristao islands.

 

Report

Report a sighting or stranding by emailing info@sousateuszii.org or contacting one of the country focal points below.

Contact person

 

Idrissa Bamy

ibamy@gmx.com

http://www.cnshb-guinee.org/

Mamoudou SANGARE

msangare@biotope.fr

https://www.guineeecologie.net

 

Relevant country-specific references

  1. Bamy, I., K. Van Waerebeek, S. Bah, M. Dia, B. Kaba, N. Keita, and S. Konate. 2010. Species occurrence of cetaceans in Guinea, including humpback whales with southern hemisphere seasonality. Marine Biodiversity Records 3:e48.
  2. Bamy, I. L., K. Van Waerebeek, S. S. Bah, M. Dia, B. Kaba, N. Keita, S. Konate, and H. Tall. 2006. The cetaceans of Guinea, a first check-list of documented species. SC/58/O15, International Whaling Commission.
  3. Bamy, I. L., A. Djiba, and K. Van Waerebeek. 2021. Recent survey for delphinids at Tristao Islands, Guinea, reinforces concern for bycatches and marine bushmeat use. Preprints (Posted 5 April 2021):16. doi: doi:10.20944/preprints202104.0094.v1

  4. Collins, T., 2015. Re-assessment of the Conservation Status of the Atlantic Humpback Dolphin (Sousa teuszii), Using the IUCN Red List Criteria. In Advances in marine biology Volume 72, pp. 47-77). Academic Press.
  5. Van Waerebeek, K., Barnett, L., Camara, A., Cham, A., Diallo, M., Djiba, A., Jallow, A.O., Ndiaye, E., Bilal, A.O. and Bamy, I.L., 2004. Distribution, status, and biology of the Atlantic humpback dolphin, Sousa teuszii (Kukenthal, 1892). Aquatic Mammals, 30(1), pp.56-83.
  6. Van Waerebeek, K., M. Uwagbae, G. Segniagbeto, I. L. Bamy, and I. Ayissi. 2015. New records of Atlantic humpback dolphin in Guinea, Nigeria, Cameroon and Togo underscore fisheries pressure and generalised marine bushmeat demand. bioRxiv:035337.
  7. Van Waerebeek, K., M. Uwagbae, G. H. Segniagbeto, I. L. Bamy, and I. Ayissi. 2017. New records of Atlantic humpback dolphin in Guinea, Nigeria, Cameroon and Togo underscore fisheries pressure and generalised marine bushmeat demand. Revue d’Ecologie (Terre et Vie) 72:192-205.
  8. Weir, C. R. 2015. Photo-identification and habitat use of Atlantic humpback dolphins Sousa teuszii around the Río Nuñez Estuary in Guinea, West Africa. African Journal of Marine Science 37:325-334. doi: https://doi.org/10.2989/1814232X.2015.1069757
  9. Weir, C. R., and T. Collins. 2015. A Review of the Geographical Distribution and Habitat of the Atlantic Humpback Dolphin (Sousa teuszii ). In: T. A. Jefferson and B. C. Curry, editors, Advances in Marine Biology Volume 72. Advances in Marine Biology No. Volume 72. Academic Press. p. 79-117.